Do I think it will be solved this century? It may not be possible – or at least, not on a commercially viable scale. It’s a very, very difficult technical problem, one of the most difficult technical problems that humanity will ever try to solve. But if we solve it, we will have “energy forever.”Bakshi: Where do you think these innovations are going to happen? Around the world? Or mostly on the west coast of the U.S.?Musk: Primarily the west coast of the U.S. It is remarkable how much is invented in California. It’s kind of ridiculous. It’s not necessarily the people who were born in California. It’s just that people come here because this is an environment that is really conducive to invention despite the high taxes and all the constraints that one faces.

I was born in Africa. I came to California because it’s really where new technologies can be brought to fruition, and I don’t see a viable competitor. It’s not to say that California is perfect – far from it. But it’s the least imperfect of any place in the world that I know of for bringing new inventions to mass market.Silicon Valley has evolved a critical mass of engineers and venture capitalists and all the support structure – the law firms, the real estate, all that – that are all actually geared toward being accepting of startups.You go to some other part of the world, and you know you can’t get a lease because your company hasn’t been around long enough; the law firm won’t give you legal advice, nobody will give you funding, you can’t find the technical talent you need. But in California, all this has arisen organically.

Usually, you hear stories of people fleeing to America, not the other way around.But the jittery state of the U.S. economy is driving an increasing number of its citizens to seek better prospects north of the border.Americans are the latest economic refugees, and they’re heading to Canada.As he prepares to campaign for re-election, U.S. President Barack Obama is expected to make a speech Thursday night that calls for immediate stimulus spending to create jobs and improve infrastructure.But those reforms will be difficult to make. Republicans, who control the House of Representatives, have resisted any efforts to boost the economy through additional spending.